Safe Driving Event

By Leicester Mercury  |  Posted: January 17, 2014
By Fiona Dryden

Read more: http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/Focus-road-safety/story-20456791-detail/story.html#ixzz2r1p2e5fT

South Leicestershire College, in South Wigston, staged a safety event with the help of Leicestershire Fire and Rescue Service, to teach students about the Fatal Four, the main causes of driving deaths among 17 to 25-year-olds. These are driving while under the influence of drink and drugs; not wearing a seatbelt; speeding and using a mobile phone while driving.

The all-day event featured presentations and videos showing scenes from car crash sites across the county.

Bringing the real-road action experience to students was the VF4 crash simulator, a Ford Focus ST that has received more than £15,000 of modifications.

It is being used by the fire service as part of a campaign aimed at young people to cut the number of road deaths.

Callum Marvin, head of student liaison and enrichment at South Leicestershire College, said: "The event gave students an insight into the implications of irresponsible driving and how it effects their lives and the lives of others. The fact the crashes shown are happening on roads that students use every day, really helped to drive the message home."

Principal Marion Plant said: "The college promotes a safe learning environment and encourages students to develop a responsibility for others."

Kellsie Wood, 17, who is studying business, said: "I'm learning to drive at the moment and this has definitely made me more cautious."

Sean O'Sullivan, 17, who is also studying business, said: "The whole event opened my eyes to the realities of how unsafe driving can affect both our lives and those of others. I learned things I'm sure many people aren't aware of, such as how newly-qualified young drivers are on probation for two years and how many serious accidents happen on the roads we use all the time to get to college. I was really amazed to hear the fire service attend more call-outs to car accidents than house fires. The whole experience was eye-opening in more ways than one."